"See the world! with neutrinos: current and future accelerator based neutrino experiments"

Date: 
Mon, 09/17/2018 - 4:15pm
Location: 
428 Pupin Hall
Kendall Mahn
Michigan State University

"See the world! with neutrinos: current and future accelerator based neutrino experiments"

One of the most promising investigations of beyond-the-Standard-Model physics has been the study of neutrino oscillation, that is, the conversion of neutrinos from one flavor to another as they propagate.  While neutrino oscillation is studied in a wide variety of experiments, accelerator based experiments, use a muon neutrino or antineutrino beam as a probe, of energies of order 1 GeV.  The most recent analysis of data from the Tokai-to-Kamioka  experiment in Japan hint at differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillation, indicative of possible CP violation with neutrinos and maximal mixing between tau and muon flavors. This talk will discuss what we aim to learn from current and future experiments, how those experiments operate, and the future challenges of accelerator based programs.

About the speaker

Kendall Mahn joined the MSU Department of Physics and Astronomy in 2014 as a high energy particle (HEP) experimentalist. In 2016, she became the ninth member of the department to receive a prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship since the program's inception in 1955. In the Fall of 2017, she became one of two analysis coordinators for the T2K Experiment.

More details on Kendall's research can be found here.