Department Calendar

July 2019

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Aaron Tohuvavohu - Penn State University

Aaron Tohuvavohu - Penn State University

Date: 
Wed, 07/10/2019 - 2:30pm
Location: 
705 Pupin Hall

 

"The search for UV and gamma-ray transient counterparts to gravitational wave events"

The epochal detection of GW 170817 was accompanied by prompt gamma-ray emission and the discovery of a short-lived UV bright kilonova. NASA's Swift Observatory hosts the only fast-response UV telescope, as well as the most sensitive gamma-ray burst detector, in operation. I will describe the unique capabilities of the Burst Alert Telescope on board Swift, and detail techniques to maximize the probability of a joint GW/GRB detection. I will then motivate and describe the details of a maximum likelihood joint GW/GRB low latency sub-threshold analysis aimed at recovering a larger population of these events and significantly extending the GW detectors' horizon. However, most BNS mergers will not have associated gamma-ray emission due to the nature of the jet, while the kilonova emission is isotropic. Further, the early UV component is critical to breaking the degeneracy between competing models of the kilonova emission. The search for UV transients has unique challenges, and I will discuss these in the context of the Swift Gravitational Wave Galaxy Survey, a 5 Million second campaign currently underway to pre-image a large fraction of the likely host galaxies for binary neutron star mergers within 100 Mpc.

About the speaker

Aaron Tohuvavohu is a member of the research staff at Penn State and an Observatory and Instrument Scientist for NASA’s Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory. Before joining the Swift team, he received his BS in theoretical physics from Reed College, and then worked for Wolfram Research designing quantum computing simulations. Aaron will start his PhD studies at the University of Toronto in the Fall. 

 

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07/10/2019 - 2:30pm
 
 
Ben Lev - Stanford University

Ben Lev - Stanford University

Date: 
Fri, 07/12/2019 - 11:00am
Location: 
705 Pupin Hall

 

"Playing with a quantum toy: Exploring thermalization near integrability with a magnetic quantum Newton's cradle"

Thermalization of near-integrable quantum systems is an unresolved question.  We will present a new experiment that explores the emergence of thermalization in a quantum system by studying the dynamics of the momentum in a dipolar quantum Newton's cradle consisting of highly magnetic dysprosium atoms.  This system constitutes the first dipolar strongly interacting 1D Bose gas. These interactions provide tunability of both the strength of the integrability-breaking perturbation and the nature of the near-integrable dynamics.  The work sheds light on the mechanisms by which isolated quantum many-body systems thermalize and on the temporal structure of the onset of thermalization. We anticipate our novel 1D dipolar gas will yield insights into quantum thermalization and strongly interacting quantum gases with long-range interactions.

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07/12/2019 - 11:00am
 
 
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Seminar on July 18, 2019 at 3:30 PM

Seminar on July 18, 2019 at 3:30 PM

Date: 
Thu, 07/18/2019 - 3:30pm
Location: 
705 Pupin

Speaker: R. Gutierrez-Jauregui, Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering, Texas A&M University

Title: "To catch a quantum jump mid-flight: a quantum trajectory perspective"

Abstract: Quantum jumps of single trapped ions were observed in the seminal experiments of Dehmelt, Wineland, and Toschek groups in the mid 1980's. The idea behind these experiments was seeded in Dehmelt's electron shelving configuration, where the fluorescence of a driven two-state system is abruptly interrupted as the system transitions to a third, metastable, state. In this sense the transition to the metastable state is inferred from the lack of fluorescence photons, a sequence of ``nothing-happened" or null measurements. Null-measurement is a cornerstone of quantum trajectory theory, a theory we apply to model the electron shelving experiment and show that the transition is described by a coherent continuous evolution. The theoretical result is supported by a recent experiment using a superconducting circuit architecture where these transitions are caught mid-flight, thus showing the coherent evolution in striking fashion.

In this talk, I review Dehmelt's original proposal from a quantum trajectory perspective before I move towards an analysis of the model recently presented using a circuit QED architecture.

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07/18/2019 - 3:30pm
 
 
 
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