Department Calendar

October 2018

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"Novel Probes of Dark Matter"

"Novel Probes of Dark Matter"

Date: 
Mon, 10/01/2018 - 2:10pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor
Cora Dvorkin
Harvard University

"Novel Probes of Dark Matter"

The particle nature of dark matter is one of the most intriguing puzzles of our time. It is therefore important to identify cosmological and astrophysical processes where the particle interactions of dark matter are of relevance.  The wealth of knowledge which is and will soon be available from cosmological surveys will reveal new information about the dark sector.

In the first part of this talk, I will discuss how we can use observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background and the large-scale structure of the universe to improve our understanding of the particle nature of dark matter. I will review my work aimed at identifying cosmological processes in which the particle interactions of dark matter are of relevance and show how we can use current and future cosmological data to probe these interactions both at large and small scales.

In the second part of the talk, I will present a new and promising technique based on gravitational lensing to probe sub-galactic scales where possible clues about dark matter physics could be hidden.

About the speaker

Cora Dvorkin's research focuses on "data-driven" cosmology: predictions from fundamental physics which can be tested with cosmological data. Her research interests span questions related to inflation, dark matter, dark energy, and neutrinos. To assess these questions, she uses data from the Cosmic Microwave Background and the large-scale structure of the universe.

More details can be found here.

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10/01/2018 - 2:10pm
 
"The Evolution, Influence, and Ultimate Fate of Massive Stars: Transient Phenomena and Stellar Astrophysics in the Era of Wide-Field Surveys"

"The Evolution, Influence, and Ultimate Fate of Massive Stars: Transient Phenomena and Stellar Astrophysics in the Era of Wide-Field Surveys"

Date: 
Mon, 10/01/2018 - 4:15pm
Location: 
428 Pupin Hall
Maria Drout
University of Toronto

"The Evolution, Influence, and Ultimate Fate of Massive Stars: Transient Phenomena and Stellar Astrophysics in the Era of Wide-Field Surveys"

An improved understanding of the lifecycle of massive stars benefits every subfield in astrophysics. Through their ionizing radiation, powerful stellar winds, nucleosynthesis, and deaths as supernova (SN) explosions, massive stars give birth to black holes and neutron stars, while stoking the dynamical and chemical evolution of the universe. Although the study of massive stars is one of the oldest subfields in astronomy, the recent advent of wide-field time-domain surveys has launched an upheaval in field of stellar evolution. In this talk I will highlight on-going efforts to constrain the evolution, influence, and ultimate fate of massive stars, using observations of both transient phenomena and resolved massive star populations in local group galaxies. Within this context I will also discuss several aspects of the recent discovery of an electromagnetic counterpart to the neutron star merger identified by LIGO/Virgo. 

About the speaker

Maria Drout is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Toronto. She is an observational astronomer who studies the evolution and death of massive stars and the origin of peculiar astronomical explosions. She was previously a NASA Hubble Fellow at Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena. received her Ph.D. from Harvard, M.A.St from the University of Cambridge, B.Sc. from the University of Iowa, and is originally from Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

More details on Maria's research can be found here.

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10/01/2018 - 4:15pm
 
 
"Recent development in photodetection for astroparticle experiments"

"Recent development in photodetection for astroparticle experiments"

Date: 
Wed, 10/03/2018 - 1:00pm
Location: 
705 Pupin Hall
Francesco Giordano
University of Bari, Italy, & Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN)

"Recent development in photodetection for astroparticle experiments"

Astroparticle experiments are requiring photodetectors capable of reveilign very low light level downt to single photon and timing capabilities of order of ns.  SiPM have been demonstrated to be a powerful devices for different experiment designes like CTA at ground or HERD in space.  Latest measurements with lasers and beam of particle on SiPM developed in Italy by FBK will be presented and discussed in details.

About the speaker

Francesco Giordano is an Associate Professor at University of Bari and Group Leader at CTA INFN activity.

Francesco's research activity is focused on experimental physics of fundamental interactions with particular reference to the design, construction and tests of detectors for space applications and telescope array installation on earth for astroparticle physics. Along with a huge experimental activity done in different international laboratories, main contribution was also related to data analysis and scientific results interpretation, as well as participation to large scientific discussion of the results within international working groups, conferences and workshops.

The results of the research activity have been presented in about 30 international conferences and led to over 200 publications.

 

 

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10/03/2018 - 1:00pm
 
 
"Novel classical and quantum photonic devices by manipulating light-matter interactions in low-dimensional systems"

"Novel classical and quantum photonic devices by manipulating light-matter interactions in low-dimensional systems"

Date: 
Fri, 10/05/2018 - 5:00pm
Location: 
11M Conference Room, North West Corner
Ritesh Agarwal
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Pennsylvania

"Novel classical and quantum photonic devices by manipulating light-matter interactions in low-dimensional systems"

Strongly confined electrical and optical excitations drastically modify material’s properties and break local symmetries that can enable precisely tunable responses and new functionalities. With an emphasis on low-dimensional materials such as nanowires and two-dimensional semiconductors, we will demonstrate how extreme confinement of fields interacting with materials produces new and unexpected response. For example, we will discuss how the strong plasmonic fields can lead to a new paradigm of nanoscale Si photonics such as optical emission in the visible region and nonlinear optical devices. The effect of plasmons on light matter interactions in 2D excitonic crystals will be demonstrated, which can be engineered to produce tunable properties such as enhanced emission, Fano resonances, exciton-plasmon polaritons and collective polaritonic oscillation mediated by exciton-exciton coupling. These responses can be precisely controlled by geometry and externally applied fields to produce novel device concepts. If time permits, our recent efforts towards understanding how symmetry breaking fields can induce new quantum phenomena such as chirality-dependent optoelectronic properties in topological Weyl semimetals and also in materials with high symmetry such as Si will be presented. Our ongoing efforts towards fabricating on-chip photodetectors sensitive to photon spin and also the angular momentum of optical beam will be discussed.

About the speaker

Ritesh Agarwal is a Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He earned his undergraduate degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur in 1996, and a master’s degree from the University of Chicago. He received his PhD in physical chemistry from University of California at Berkeley in 2001 researching liquid and protein solvation and photosynthesis via multiple-pulse nonlinear optical techniques. After completing his PhD., Ritesh was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard where he studied the optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanowires. His current research interests include structural, chemical, optical and electronic properties of low-dimensional systems. He is the recipient of the NSF CAREER award in 2007, NIH Director’s New Innovator Award in 2010 and the SPIE Nanoengineering Pioneer Award in 2014. In 2017 he became the director of a Multi University Research Initiative on Phase Change Materials for Photonics, leading a team of six PIs from five universities.

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10/05/2018 - 5:00pm
 
 
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"From 3D to 2D and back again"

"From 3D to 2D and back again"

Date: 
Mon, 10/08/2018 - 4:15pm
Location: 
428 Pupin Hall
Cory Dean
Columbia University

"From 3D to 2D and back again"

Graphene , a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice, is probably the best known, and most extensively characterized two-dimensional material.  However, this represents just one of a larger class of layered materials, in which weak interlayer-forces make it possible to mechanically isolate monolayers from the bulk.  This weak interlayer bonding also makes it possible to interleave monolayers from different crystals together to form entirely new layered structures.  Fabricating materials by the mechanical assembly of individual layers provides a new and unprecedented level of control in device engineering where crystals with wildly different properties can be mixed and match, virtually at will.  In this talk I will describe some of the techniques we have developed to make this possible and highlight new quantum phases that emerge as a result. I will additionally discuss recent efforts where,  by tuning the geometry of  these heterostructures at the nanoscale,  we realize the capability to induce and dynamically control novel electronic phases in these systems, in ways that are not possible in conventional materials. 

About the speaker

Cory Dean's research focuses on both fundamental studies, and technological applications of solid state devices at the meso- and nano-scale. General areas of study include electron transport in degenerate many body systems where strong interactions lead to new states of matter and novel electronic behaviour resulting from new device archictectures. Systems that we study include layered materials such as graphene and related heterostructures, transition metal dichalcogenides, and topological insulators as well as more conventional 2D electron systems such as III-V semiconductors. Cory's research group probes these systems by combining transport studies with a variety of experimental knobs such as applied magnetic and electrostatic fields, variable tempeartures from ambient down to miliKelvin, high vacuum, spatial confinement down to the nano-scale, variable charge carrier densities, and unconventional NMR techniques.

More details can be found here.

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10/08/2018 - 4:15pm
 
 
Caterina Vernieri, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory & ATLAS

Caterina Vernieri, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory & ATLAS

Date: 
Wed, 10/10/2018 - 1:00pm
Location: 
705 Pupin Hall

 

"Higgs to beauty quarks. First observation of the big missing piece"

The Higgs boson discovery at the LHC marked a historic milestone in the study of fundamental particles and their interactions. Over the last six years, we have begun measuring its properties, which are essential to build a deep understanding of the Higgs sector of the Standard Model and to potentially uncover new phenomena. The Higgs' favored decay mode to beauty (b) quarks (~60%) had so far remained elusive because of the overwhelming background of b-quark production due to strong interactions. Observing the Higgs decay to b-quarks was one of the critical missing pieces of our knowledge of the Higgs sector. Measuring this decay is a fundamental step to confirm the mass generation for fermions and may also provide hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. The CMS observation of the decay of the SM Higgs boson into a pair of b-quarks exploiting an exclusive production mode (VH) is yet another major milestone. This experimental achievement at the LHC, considered nearly impossible in the past, makes use of several advanced machine learning techniques to identify the b-quark distinctive signature, improve the Higgs boson mass resolution, and discriminate the Higgs boson signal from background processes.

About the speaker

Caterina Vernieri's research involves the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the b-quarks decay mode and investigate new physics scenarios involving highly boosted Higgs boson. The b-tagging technique for boosted Higgs that Caterina developed is relevant for these searches as the decay to b-quarks represents by far the largest Higgs branching fraction. She continues to work on improving the existing algorithm with the use of more sophisticated machine learning tools.

In 2012 Caterina joined CMS as a PhD student working on b-tagging algorithms optimization and a search for resonance decaying to HH, where each H decays to b-quarks. As FNAL research associate (2014-present), she's focused on searches for the Standard Model Higgs in the b-quarks decay mode and new heavy resonances decaying to boosted Higgs, and on developing machine learning for b-quark identification in the boosted regime. In addition, Caterina is involved in the R&D of the CMS silicon pixel detector for the upgrade at the high luminosity of the LHC and is currently co-leading the CMS sub-group on Standard Model and beyond searches for Higgs decaying to b-quarks in the Higgs physics group.

More details can be found here.

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10/10/2018 - 1:00pm
 
Bruce D. Gaulin, McMaster University

Bruce D. Gaulin, McMaster University

Date: 
Thu, 10/11/2018 - 12:00pm
Location: 
705 Pupin Hall

 

"Ground State Selection in Quantum Pyrochlore Magnets"

The pyrochlore lattice, a network of corner-sharing tetrahedra, is one of the most pervasive crystalline architectures in nature that supports geometrical frustration.  We and others have been interested in a family of rare earth pyrochlore magnets with local XY anisotropy, that can display quantum S=1/2 magnetism on such a lattice.  I will discuss up to three such magnets, Yb2Ti2O7, Er2Ti2O7 and Er2Pt2O7.  Yb2Ti2O7 has been discussed as a "quantum spin ice" candidate ground state system; Er2Ti2O7 displays a non-colinear Neel state at low temperature, selected by an order-by-disorder mechanism, while Er2Pt2O7 displays a novel "Palmer Chalker" state at low temperatures.  I will emphasize neutron scattering studies that we have carried out, and briefly discuss how their ground state selection can be understood in terms of anisotropic exchange on the pyrochlore lattice.

About the speaker

Bruce D. Gaulin is Distinguished University Professor and Brockhouse Chair in the Physics of Materials at McMaster University.  He received his BSc from McGill, before completing his PhD at McMaster in 1986.  Gaulin spent two years as a postdoc at Oak Ridge National Laboratory before returning to McMaster as an Assistant Professor, where he has been ever since.  His expertise lies in the application of neutron scattering techniques to topical problems in condensed matter physics, mainly focussing on quantum and frustrated magnetism.  Gaulin served as President of the Neutron Scattering Society of America from 2008 - 2012, and presently serves as President of the Canadian Association of Physicists.
 
More details can be found here.
 
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10/11/2018 - 12:00pm
 
 
 
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Sergei Dubovsky, New York University

Sergei Dubovsky, New York University

Date: 
Mon, 10/15/2018 - 2:10pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor

 

"Confining strings in diverse dimensions"

I will present a status report for the study of confining strings. First, I will focus on confining strings in massive adjoint two-dimensional QCD, where analytical progress is most straightforward to achieve. Then I will describe lessons learnt from this study for confining strings in higher dimensions and discuss relations between confining strings, 2d gravity and T¯ deformation.

Title & abstract TBA

About the speaker

I work at the interface of particle theory, cosmology and string theory. Among other topics I'm interested in the physics of black holes, eternal inflation, long distance modifications of gravity. Most recently, my work was focused on the cosmological and astrophysical signatures of axion-like particles motivated by string theory. In particular, I'm studying the intriguing possibility to use the ongoing observations of astrophysical black holes as a tool to discover such particles.

More details can be found here.

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10/15/2018 - 2:10pm
 
Brian Humensky, Columbia University

Brian Humensky, Columbia University

Date: 
Mon, 10/15/2018 - 4:15pm
Location: 
428 Pupin Hall

 

"Particle Accelerators in Space: An Air-Cherenkov Telescope’s View"

Our universe carries a small but important population of highly energetic denizens, including supernova remnants with fast shocks, and relativistic jets launched by stellar mergers and collapses, as well as by supermassive black holes. All of these environments conspire to generate populations of nonthermal particles, and observations of the very high energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) gamma rays produced by these particles are gradually revealing the methods by which Nature accelerates cosmic rays, as well as the ways in which those cosmic rays escape and diffuse into the interstellar medium. Telescopes like VERITAS, employing the imaging air Cherenkov telescope technique, bring a unique and invaluable combination of angular resolution, energy resolution, and effective area to these observations. Recent work includes studies of cosmic-ray acceleration in the supernova remnants Cassiopeia A and IC 443, as well as the collective effects of many accelerators in the starburst galaxy M82. Meanwhile, the direct detection for the first time of gravitational wave transients by Advanced LIGO and the emergence of neutrino astronomy are providing new tools with which to probe the nature and environments of cosmic accelerators. In this talk, we discuss the impact VERITAS has had on our understanding of Galactic and cosmic accelerators, as well as status and plans for the next generation of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA). This work includes a novel, 9.7-m diameter prototype for CTA utilizing the Schwarzschild-Couder optical design that is currently being commissioned at the VERITAS site.

About the speaker

Brian Humensky's research activity is in the area of gamma-ray astrophysics and works on VERITAS, the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System, and CTA, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (a next-generation instrument). Brian collaborates closely with fellow VERITAS and CTA member Reshmi Mukherjee.

More details on Brian's research can be found here.

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10/15/2018 - 4:15pm
 
 
 
"2D Polaritonics in and the Control of Light at the Atomic Scale"

"2D Polaritonics in and the Control of Light at the Atomic Scale"

Date: 
Thu, 10/18/2018 - 2:40pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall 329
Dr. Javier Garcia de Abajo
 ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques

" 2D Polaritonics in and the Control of Light at the Atomic Scale"

 

Two-dimensional materials have been recently shown to host robust polaritonic modes, ranging from plasmons in highly doped graphene to excitions in transition metal dichalcogenides. The electromagnetic behavior of these modes can be well understood in terms of an effective surface conductivity, in which we can capture their strong dependence on temperature and external static electric and magnetic fields. In this talk, I will overview the general characteristics of the optical response of these materials, which we can understand in terms of simple theoretical descriptions. We will also cover more sophisticated descriptions, aiming at exploring genuinely quantum-mechanical effects. We will further overview recent advances in ultrafast optical response and nonlinear optics, as well as the potential application of these materials for quantum-optics and optical sensing.

About the speaker

Javier García de Abajo received his PhD from the University of the Basque Country in 1993 and then visited Berkeley National Lab for three years. He was a Research Professor at the Spanish CSIC and in 2013 moved to ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques (Barcelona) as an ICREA Research Professor and Group Leader. He is Fellow of both the American Physical Society and the Optical Society of America. García de Abajo has co-authored 300+ articles cited 24,000+ times with a h index of 75 (Oct 2018 WoK data), including contributions on different aspects of surface science, nanophotonics, and electron microscope spectroscopies.

More details can be found here.

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10/18/2018 - 2:40pm
 
Javier García de Abajo, ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques

Javier García de Abajo, ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques

Date: 
Thu, 10/18/2018 - 2:40pm
Location: 
329 Pupin Hall

 

"2D Polaritonics in and the Control of Light at the Atomic Scale"

Two-dimensional materials have been recently shown to host robust polaritonic modes, ranging from plasmons in highly doped graphene to excitions in transition metal dichalcogenides. The electromagnetic behavior of these modes can be well understood in terms of an effective surface conductivity, in which we can capture their strong dependence on temperature and external static electric and magnetic fields. In this talk, I will overview the general characteristics of the optical response of these materials, which we can understand in terms of simple theoretical descriptions. We will also cover more sophisticated descriptions, aiming at exploring genuinely quantum-mechanical effects. We will further overview recent advances in ultrafast optical response and nonlinear optics, as well as the potential application of these materials for quantum-optics and optical sensing.

About the speaker

Javier García de Abajo received his PhD from the University of the Basque Country in 1993 and then visited Berkeley National Lab for three years. He was a Research Professor at the Spanish CSIC and in 2013 moved to ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques (Barcelona) as an ICREA Research Professor and Group Leader. He is Fellow of both the American Physical Society and the Optical Society of America. García de Abajo has co-authored 300+ articles cited 24,000+ times with a h index of 75 (Oct 2018 WoK data), including contributions on different aspects of surface science, nanophotonics, and electron microscope spectroscopies.

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10/18/2018 - 2:40pm
 
 
 
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Miguel Campiglia, Universidad de la República
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10/22/2018 - 2:10pm
 
Jo Dunkley, Princeton University

Jo Dunkley, Princeton University

Date: 
Mon, 10/22/2018 - 4:15pm
Location: 
428 Pupin Hall

 

"The Simons Observatory: cosmology from the microwave sky"

The Simons Observatory (SO) is a new cosmic microwave background experiment being built in the Atacama Desert in Chile, due to begin observations in the early 2020s. SO will measure the temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background using 60,000 detectors measuring the sky in six frequency bands. The observatory will have three 0.5-m telescopes and one 6-m telescope. I will describe the scientific goals of the experiment: to characterize the primordial perturbations that were imprinted in the early universe, to measure the mass of neutrino particles and the number of relativistic species, to test for deviations from a cosmological constant, to improve our understanding of galaxy evolution, and to constrain the duration of cosmic reionization.  I will focus in particular on the way in which we will be searching for gravitational waves from the primordial universe, and how we will seek to measure the neutrino mass scale.

About the speaker

Jo Dunkley's research is in cosmology, studying the origins and evolution of the Universe. Her main projects are the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, the Simons Observatory, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

​Jo has been awarded the Maxwell Medal, the Fowler Prize, the Rosalind Franklin award and the Philip Leverhulme Prize for her work on the Cosmic Microwave Background, and shared the Gruber Prize with the WMAP team. 

More details can be found here.

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10/22/2018 - 4:15pm
 
 
 
Allan MacDonald, University of Texas at Austin

Allan MacDonald, University of Texas at Austin

Date: 
Thu, 10/25/2018 - 12:00pm
Location: 
705 Pupin Hall

 

"Magic Angle Bilayer Graphene"

When twisted to a set of magic angles, the Dirac velocity of bilayer graphene vanishes and extremely flat low-energy moiré bands emerge. It has recently been discovered that strong-correlation physics, including broken-symmetry insulating states and strong-coupling superconductivity, appears when the flat bands are partially occupied. In this talk I will discuss recent work on the character of the insulating state, focusing on the non-zero Chern numbers of valley projected moiré bands, and speculate  on the origin of superconductivity.

About the speaker

Allan H. MacDonald  received the B.Sc. degree from St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1973 and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the University of Toronto in 1974 and 1978 respectively.  He was a member of the research staff of the National Research Council of Canada from 1978 to 1987 and has taught at Indiana University (1987-2000) and the University of Texas  at Austin (2000-present) where he now holds the Sid W. Richardson Chair in Physics. He has contributed to research on the quantum Hall effect, electronic structure theory, magnetism, and superconductivity among a variety of other topics.  Dr. MacDonald is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences, and a recipient of the Herzberg Medal and the Buckley Prize.

More details can be found here.

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10/25/2018 - 12:00pm
 
William Cairncross, University of Colorado at Boulder

William Cairncross, University of Colorado at Boulder

Date: 
Fri, 10/26/2018 - 11:00am
Location: 
705 Pupin Hall

 

"Precision measurement of the electron’s electric dipole moment with trapped molecular ions"

The pyrochlore lattice, a network of corner-sharing tetrahedra, is one of the most pervasive crystalline architectures in nature that supports geometrical frustration.  We and others have been interested in a family of rare earth pyrochlore magnets with local XY anisotropy, that can display quantum S=1/2 magnetism on such a lattice.  I will discuss up to three such magnets, Yb2Ti2O7, Er2Ti2O7 and Er2Pt2O7.  Yb2Ti2O7 has been discussed as a "quantum spin ice" candidate ground state system; Er2Ti2O7 displays a non-colinear Neel state at low temperature, selected by an order-by-disorder mechanism, while Er2Pt2O7 displays a novel "Palmer Chalker" state at low temperatures.  I will emphasize neutron scattering studies that we have carried out, and briefly discuss how their ground state selection can be understood in terms of anisotropic exchange on the pyrochlore lattice.

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10/26/2018 - 11:00am
 
Azadeh Keivani, Columbia University

Azadeh Keivani, Columbia University

Date: 
Fri, 10/26/2018 - 11:00am
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor

 

Azadeh Keivani is an astrophysicist studying the most violent phenomena in the Universe using data from several high-energy astrophysical observatories in a multi-messenger and multi-wavelength discipline. Currently, she is a Frontiers of Science Fellow at Columbia University, searching for jointly emitting Gravitational Wave and High-Energy Neutrino sources. 

More details on Azadeh's research can be found here.

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10/26/2018 - 11:00am
 
 
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Josh Ruderman, NYU

Josh Ruderman, NYU

Date: 
Mon, 10/29/2018 - 2:10pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor

 

Title & abstract TBA

About the speaker

Joshua Ruderman received his B.S. from Stanford in 2006 and his Ph.D. from Princeton in 2011. He was a Miller Fellow at UC Berkeley from 2011-2014, and he joined the faculty of the CCPP at NYU in 2014. He is broadly interested in particle theory, with a focus on physics beyond the Standard Model. His work often resides at the interface of theory and experiment, where he studies the implications of ongoing and future experiments for theories of particles. He is interested in using high energy colliders, direct detection experiments, and astrophysical measurements to learn about the origins of the Higgs and dark matter.

More details can be found here.

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10/29/2018 - 2:10pm
 
Chris Tully, Princeton University

Chris Tully, Princeton University

Date: 
Mon, 10/29/2018 - 4:15pm
Location: 
428 Pupin Hall

 

Title & abstract TBA

About the speaker

Chris Tully earned his PhD in high-energy physics from Princeton University (*98) and his B.S. at Caltech (‘92).  He is a professor of physics at Princeton University and has served as associate chair of the physics department.  His research in particle physics spans three decades of energy-frontier particle colliders at Fermilab and CERN, and he was part of the team that discovered the Higgs boson at the LHC.  He was awarded NSF, CERN, Sloan and IBM-Einstein Fellowships.  He is the author of a popular textbook “Elementary Particle Physics in a Nutshell” and is a contributing author to “100 Years of Subatomic Physics.”

More details on Brian's research can be found here.

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10/29/2018 - 4:15pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
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