Department Calendar

September 2019

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Keith Baker - Yale

Keith Baker - Yale

Date: 
Mon, 09/09/2019 - 12:30pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor

 

"Quantum Information Science and High Energy Physics at the Large Hadron Collider"

The relationship between quantum entanglement and an observed thermalization in particle production - even in the Higgs boson channel - at the Large Hadron Collider (Rev. D 98, 054007 (2018)) will be presented.  The considerable amount of collected data at 13 TeV proton-proton collision energy enables systematic investigation of this initial study and additional links between Quantum Information Science and particle physics at the energy frontier.  Near-term future studies will also be presented.

About the speaker

Keith Baker's research is in experimental particle physics: The energy frontier at the Large Hadron Collider in the ATLAS collaboration and precision studies at sub-eV energies.  Current topics include quantum information science in HEP, electroweak symmetry breaking, and beyond the standard model physics searches.

More details on Keith's research can be found here.

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09/09/2019 - 12:30pm
 
Guillermo Ballesteros - Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

Guillermo Ballesteros - Universidad Autónoma de Madrid

Date: 
Mon, 09/09/2019 - 2:10pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor

 

"Primordial black hole dark matter from single field inflation"

I will discuss the idea that black holes may constitute la large fraction of the Universe’s dark matter, focusing mostly on their formation from large primordial fluctuations generated during inflation.

I will summarize the ups and downs of this mechanism and comment on potential ideas that may help to alleviate its main shortcoming. 

About the speaker

Guillermo obtained his PhD in Physics at U. Autónoma de Madrid (Spain) and held postdoctoral positions in Italy (U. di Padova), Switzerlad (U. de Genève) and Germany (U. Heidelberg). As a theoretical cosmologist, Guillermo is interested in the dynamics of the universe as a whole, its origin and evolution. He also works on specific open questions in the realm of the  microcosm of particle physics, which are intimately connected to the vast scales of the universe.

More details on Guillermo's research can be found here.

 

 
 
 
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09/09/2019 - 2:10pm
 
 
JiHee Kim - University of Utah

JiHee Kim - University of Utah

Date: 
Wed, 09/11/2019 - 1:00pm
Location: 
705 Pupin Hall

 

"The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum above 0.1 EeV measured by the Telescope Array and TALE Fluorescence Telescopes"

The Telescope Array (TA), deployed in the desert of central Utah, is the largest cosmic ray detector in the Northern hemisphere. It was initially designed to observe ultra high energy cosmic rays with energies > 10^{19} eV. It consists of three telescope stations viewing the sky over an array of scintillator surface detectors. The fluorescence telescopes observe the longitudinal development of an extensive air shower induced by an incident cosmic ray by detecting the scintillation light as the shower develops. Meanwhile, the array of scintillator surface detectors measures the lateral distribution of particles reaching the Earth's surface. More recently the Telescope Array Low-energy Extension (TALE) was added to lower the experiment'senergy threshold. This was accomplished by installing high elevation angle telescopes to one of the telescope stations and adding a graded array of more densely spaced surface detectors to the existing main array. This allows us to extend our study to cosmic rays as low in energy as ~10^{15.3} eV. The observatory now consists of 48 fluorescence telescopes at three stations viewing the sky above an array of 610 surface detectors. The scintillator array is spread over ~750 km^{2}. One complication of combining TA and TALE telescope data is that these telescopes use significantly different electronics for historical reasons. In this talk, I will present a measurement of the energy spectrum in the energy range of 10^{17.2}-10^{19.0} eV using fluorescence data collected by the TA and TALE telescopes.

About the speaker

JiHee Kim earned her B.S. and a M.S. degree in Astronomy from Chungnam National University in South Korea. During this time she was also working with the Telescope Array which is an international cosmic ray research collaboration. She moved to the University of Utah, the host institution of the experiment, to pursue her Ph.D. which she completed in 2018. Dr. Kim is currently a post-doctoral research associate at the University of Utah where she is continuing research on the energy spectrum and composition of ultra high energy cosmic rays at the Telescope Array as well as studying the systematic uncertainty in air fluorescence yields.

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09/11/2019 - 1:00pm
 
 
 
 
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Ania Bleszynski Jayich - UC Santa Barbara

Ania Bleszynski Jayich - UC Santa Barbara

Date: 
Mon, 09/16/2019 - 12:30pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor

 

"Quantum sensing and imaging with diamond spins"

The nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is an atomic-scale defect in diamond that is highly sensitive to a wide variety of fields: magnetic, electric, thermal, and strain. A versatile quantum sensor, the NV center holds particular promise for nanometer-scale imaging. Here I discuss an NV-based imaging platform where we have incorporated an NV center into a scanning probe microscope and used it to image a variety of condensed matter systems, including skyrmions, nanoscale topological spin textures, as well as current flow patterns in graphene. I also discuss recent experiments that utilize the NV center’s sensitivity to fluctuating magnetic fields to image conductivity with nanoscale spatial resolution. A grand challenge to improving the spatial resolution and magnetic sensitivity of the NV is mitigating surface-induced quantum decoherence, which I will discuss in the second part of this talk. Decoherence at interfaces is a universal problem that affects many quantum technologies, but the microscopic origins are as yet unclear. Our studies guide the ongoing development of quantum control and materials control, pushing towards the ultimate goal of NV-based single nuclear spin imaging.

About the speaker

Ania Bleszynski Jayich received her Ph.D. in Physics from Harvard in 2006 and her B.S. in Physics and Mathematical and Computational Science from Stanford in 2000. Under the supervision of Prof. Bob Westervelt, her thesis focused on scanned probe imaging of electron flow in semiconductor nanostructures. As a postdoc in Prof. Jack Harris's group at Yale, she worked on magnetization measurements of condensed matter systems using ultrasensitive micromechanical detectors. Before joining UCSB as an assistant professor in 2010, she worked on coupling nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond to nanomechanical resonators, in a project co-supervised by Profs. Misha Lukin at Harvard and Jack Harris.

The Jayich Lab at UCSB studies quantum effects on the nanoscale. They focus on nanoscale imaging of spin and charge in condensed matter systems, with an eye on applications in quantum and classical computing and biology. The lab is also interested in hybrid quantum systems consisting of spin, phonons and photons.

More details on Ania's research can be found here.

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09/16/2019 - 12:30pm
 
Soubhik Kumar - University of Maryland

Soubhik Kumar - University of Maryland

Date: 
Mon, 09/16/2019 - 2:10pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor

 

"Primordial Non-Gaussianity as a probe of (ultra high-energy) gauge theories"

Future measurements of primordial non-Gaussianity (NG) can reveal the mass and the spin information of cosmologically produced particles with masses of order the inflationary Hubble scale, H_inf, which can be as high as 10^13 GeV. In this talk, I will describe how such NG measurements can be used as an on-shell probe of, a) Grand Unified Theories and, b) low scale gauge theories that get “heavy-lifted” to ~ H_inf scales. I will also discuss a simple alternative to the standard inflationary paradigm, involving a curvaton field, that can allow NG signals orders of magnitude larger compared to standard inflation. This brings various motivated particle physics signatures, such as loops of heavy gauge-charged scalars and fermions, within future observational reach.

About the speaker

Soubhik Kumar is currently a graduate student at the University of Maryland working on theoretical particle physics. He completed his undergraduate degree in Physics from Kolkata, India.

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09/16/2019 - 2:10pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Philip Kim - Harvard

Philip Kim - Harvard

Date: 
Mon, 09/23/2019 - 12:30pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor

 

Title & abstract TBA

About the speaker

Philip Kim is Professor of Physics and Professor Applied Physics at Harvard University. Professor Kim is a world leading scientist in the area of materials research. His research area is experimental condensed matter physics with an emphasis on physical properties and applications of nanoscale low-dimensional materials.  The focus of Prof. Kim’s group research is the mesoscopic investigation of transport phenomena, particularly, electric, thermal and thermoelectrical properties of low dimensional nanoscale materials.

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09/23/2019 - 12:30pm
 
Garrett Goon - Carnegie-Mellon University

Garrett Goon - Carnegie-Mellon University

Date: 
Mon, 09/23/2019 - 2:10pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor

 

"Linking Corrections to Entropy and Extremality"

I will prove that the leading perturbative corrections to the entropy and extremality bounds of black holes are directly proportional to each other, generically.  This fact is intimately related to the Weak Gravity Conjecture, as I will discuss. The proof is purely thermodynamic and applies to systems beyond the gravitational realm. 

About the speaker

Garrett Goon is a research associate (postdoc) in Carnegie Mellon University’s Physics department working with Riccardo Penco and Ira Rothstein.  Garrett's research interests involve the application of Quantum Field Theory to gravitational problems.

More details on Garrett's research can be found here.

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09/23/2019 - 2:10pm
 
 
 
Pablo Jarillo-Herrero - MIT

Pablo Jarillo-Herrero - MIT

Date: 
Thu, 09/26/2019 - 12:00pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor

 

Title & abstract TBA

About the speaker

Pablo Jarillo-Herrero is currently Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics at MIT. He joined MIT as an assistant professor of physics in January 2008. He received his "Licenciatura" in physics from the University of Valencia, Spain, in 1999. Then he spent two years at the University of California in San Diego, where he received a M.Sc. degree before going to the Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands, where he earned his Ph.D. in 2005. After a one-year postdoc in Delft, he moved to Columbia University, where he worked as a NanoResearch Initiative Fellow. His awards include the Spanish Royal Society Young Investigator Award (2006), an NSF Career Award (2008), an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship (2009), a David and Lucile Packard Fellowship (2009), the IUPAP Young Scientist Prize in Semiconductor Physics (2010), a DOE Early Career Award (2011), a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE, 2012), an ONR Young Investigator Award (2013), an a Moore Foundation Experimental Physics in Quantum Systems Investigator Award (2014). Prof. Jarillo-Herrero was selected as a Highly Cited Researcher by Clarivate Analytics-Web of Science (2017 & 2018), and elected as APS Fellow (2018). He was promoted to Full Professor of Physics in 2018.

Pablo's research interests lie in the area of experimental condensed matter physics, in particular quantum electronic transport and optoelectronics in novel two-dimensional materials, with special emphasis on investigating their superconducting, magnetic, and topological properties.

More details on Pablo's research can be found here.

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09/26/2019 - 12:00pm
 
 
 
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