Department Calendar

Week of September 16, 2018

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"5d Coulomb branches and 6d Anomaly cancelation"

"5d Coulomb branches and 6d Anomaly cancelation"

Date: 
Mon, 09/17/2018 - 2:10pm
Location: 
Pupin Hall Theory Center, 8th Floor
Monica Jinwoo Kang
Harvard University

"5d Coulomb branches and 6d Anomaly cancelation"

In this talk, I will present Coulomb branches and Chern-Simons terms from the compactification of M-theory on elliptically fibered Calabi-Yau threefolds. I will further check that the uplifted theory in 6d is anomaly-free. I will focus on the theory with a gauge group SU(2)xG2, which plays a major role in the classification of superconformal theories.

About the speaker

Monica Jinwoo Kang is a Ph.D. candidate at Harvard University in the High Energy Theory Group.  Monica's primary interests are M/F-theory, elliptic fibrations, 5/6d supersymmetric gauge theories, and 6d superconformal field theory.  Her advisor is Daniel Jafferis and collaborators incolude Mboyo Esole and Shing-Tung Yau.  Monica was born and raised in Korea where she attended Korea Science Academy and graduated from UC Berkeley in Mathematics and Physics in May 2012.

More details can be found here.

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09/17/2018 - 2:10pm
 
 
 
"See the world! with neutrinos: current and future accelerator based neutrino experiments"

"See the world! with neutrinos: current and future accelerator based neutrino experiments"

Date: 
Mon, 09/17/2018 - 4:15pm
Location: 
428 Pupin Hall
Kendall Mahn
Michigan State University

"See the world! with neutrinos: current and future accelerator based neutrino experiments"

One of the most promising investigations of beyond-the-Standard-Model physics has been the study of neutrino oscillation, that is, the conversion of neutrinos from one flavor to another as they propagate.  While neutrino oscillation is studied in a wide variety of experiments, accelerator based experiments, use a muon neutrino or antineutrino beam as a probe, of energies of order 1 GeV.  The most recent analysis of data from the Tokai-to-Kamioka  experiment in Japan hint at differences between neutrino and antineutrino oscillation, indicative of possible CP violation with neutrinos and maximal mixing between tau and muon flavors. This talk will discuss what we aim to learn from current and future experiments, how those experiments operate, and the future challenges of accelerator based programs.

About the speaker

Kendall Mahn joined the MSU Department of Physics and Astronomy in 2014 as a high energy particle (HEP) experimentalist. In 2016, she became the ninth member of the department to receive a prestigious Sloan Research Fellowship since the program's inception in 1955. In the Fall of 2017, she became one of two analysis coordinators for the T2K Experiment.

More details on Kendall's research can be found here.

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09/17/2018 - 4:15pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
"Shining light on van der Waals materials"

"Shining light on van der Waals materials"

Date: 
Fri, 09/21/2018 - 5:00pm
Location: 
11M Conference Room – North West Corner
Hyunyong Choi
School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749, Korea

"Shining light on van der Waals materials"

In this talk, I will discuss how laser excitation can be used to manipulate the quantum degree of freedom in van der Waals materials. First part of this talk is about inversion-symmetry breaking in multi-layer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) and the associated non-local detection of valley-locked spin photocurrent in topological insulators (TI) using the characteristic spin-momentum locking [1]. In the second part, I will discuss the coherent exciton dynamics in group VII TMDs, where the broken in-plane symmetry plays a key role in observing the light-polarization-dependent phenomena [2,3]. Finally, I will show both intrinsic and extrinsic ways of manipulating the interaction dynamics between the surface and bulk states in TIs, where we have observed a strong Fano-like asymmetric response via optical-pump and terahertz (THz) probe spectroscopy. [4,5].

References:

  • [1] Cha, S. et al. Nature Nanotechnology in press (2018).
  • [2] Sim, S. et al. Nature Communications 9, 351 (2018).
  • [3] Sim, S. et al. Nature Communications 7, 13569 (2016).
  • [4] Sim, S. et al. Nature Communications 6, 8814 (2015).
  • [5] In, C. et al. Nano Letters 18, 734 (2018).

 

About the speaker

Professor Hyunyong Choi received his B.S. degree in department of electrical and electronic engineering at Yonsei University in 2002. He did his M.S. and Ph.D. in department of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (under Prof. Ted Norris) in 2004 and 2007, respectively, and postdocs at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory until 2010. Since then, he has been working at Yonsei University as an Assistant Professor (2011.3-2015.8) and as an Associate Professor (2015.9-present).

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09/21/2018 - 5:00pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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